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Savannah Walking Ghost Tour

May 14, 2013

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(The cobblestone walkway that separates Abercorn St. from the Colonial Cemetery. The cemetery was truncated to create more space. Both the street and walkway were built directly over occupied graves in a much less sensitive era.)

Our walking tour guide, Steve Ellis, served up heaping platters of Savannah history. He is a bountiful fount of information set at maximum. A life-long resident and retired fireman, he has a joyous enthusiasm for his home town.

As Lovers of history, as well as bizarre and chilling anecdotes, my wife and I greedily jotted down notes.

What follows are snippets of information gleaned from Steve:

• The childhood tragedy of future Pulitzer Prize winning poet Conrad Aiken. One particularly dark night, the boy found himself orphaned after his father shot his wife and then took his own life

• The abundance of gnarled live oaks in Savannah were planted at about the same time and are, therefore, a hundred years old

• Button Gwinnett was the second man to sign the Declaration of Independence. He also came in second in a heated contest involving dueling pistols. His remains are buried somewhere in the crowded confines of Colonial Cemetery

• Along with Button Gwinnett, lie thousands of other recipients of an untimely demise. The causes were due mostly to war, fire and yellow fever

• Nathaniel Green was second in command under George Washington. He survived the Revolutionary War only to come to Savannah and fall dead from sun stroke

• Laura’s house is the most haunted place. It can be rented for a minimum of three nights. Renters usually stay only one

• Tales of pirates, secret tunnels, illegal goods and shanghaied sailors

• The bloodiest hour of the Revolutionary War occurred in Savannah

• Jim Williams was mentioned and the book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

• Zonzie sandwich shop makes the third best sandwich in America. Buy “The Conquistador”

• Savannah was established in 1733 by Ogelthorpe who met Tomo chi chi, a seven-feet tall Creek Indian chief

• Jones street is the most haunted street

The next day, we tried “The Conquistador” at Zunzi’s. It was, indeed, very good.

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From → Blogs, My Travels

3 Comments
  1. Sounds like you’ve acquired a lot of inspiration. How about a ghost story.

  2. Steve is one of Savannah’s best!

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